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Isaan Lives: Singing the song of resistance

After two and a half years in prison for performing in a play deemed offensive to the monarchy, Isaan artist Patiwat Saraiyaem struggles with the stigma of being an ex-convict. But the time behind bars also fueled his creative fire.

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Isaan migration through the lens of love

Migration has been grabbing global news for years. But the rising migration trend of Isaan women to western countries in the past 15 years has gone largely unnoticed.

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Martin Wheeler, the simple life that slipped away

Living the life of a farmer in rural Isaan, Martin Wheeler became the poster child for organic agriculture and the sufficiency economy model. But much of the attention, Wheeler says, was misdirected. His farm which once grew rice and vegetables is now filled with sugarcane and grown with chemical fertilizer.

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LATEST UPDATE

Features

Rasi Salai Dam violates people’s cultural rights

More than two decades after a lush wetland forest disappeared into a man-made reservoir, the people of Rasi Salai still feel ripples. Having lost their traditional livelihoods to the dam, they are determined not to let it swallow up their cultural traditions as well.
Features

Isaan Lives: A gold mine, a chair and an artist-turned-activist

A young woman is drawn into activism to defend her home in Loei Province against a gold mining project.
Features

Eyes on heaven – Isaan’s Christian converts navigate a rocky road to acceptance

Christian converts are carving out a place for themselves in Isaan as they navigate a society dominated by other belief systems.
Features

Isaan Lives: Vietnamese sandwiches and a word with Jehovah

A second-generation Thai-Vietnamese shopkeeper chose a uncommon faith in the Northeast
Features

The avatars of Rasi Salai

In Rasi Salai, “the capital city of spirits,” locals use their connections to ancient forest spirits to protest development projects and protect the environment.